Research Meeting on Middle East and Islamic Studies

Date / Time 30 March 2012 (Fri.) 14:00-18:00
Venue 304 (Multimedia Conference Room), ILCAA
Language Japanese
Mayuko OKAWA (Research Associate, ILCAA)
“Omani Networks in East Africa under Colonial Rule: Their Social Relationships through Islam and Arabic language”
Yasuhiro FUKUSHIMA (Research Associate, ILCAA)
“Economic Activities Based on Islam: A Case Study on Industries in Malaysia”

The 2nd meeting:ILCAA Joint Research Project "Multi-disciplinary Study on Islam and Cultural Diversity in Southeast Asia"

International Workshop “Cultural Diversity and its Social/Political Implication in Southeast Asia”

Date / Time 25 February 2012 (Sat.) 14:00-18:00
Venue Room 304 (Multimedia Conference Room), ILCAA
Language English

Report

Ikuya TOKORO (ILCAA)
“Opening Remarks”
Davisakd Puaksom (Walailak University)
“The Fragmented Modernities: the Quest for a Social and Cultural History of Patani”
Chaiwat Satha-Anand (Thammasat University)
“Muslims’ Contested Modernities in the Context of Violent Ethnic Conflict”
Comment 1: Takashi KAWABATA (ILCAA Joint Researcher)
Comment 2: Michiko TSUNEDA (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
All members : Discussion
Ryoko NISHII (ILCAA)
“Closing Remarks”

JaCMES Lecture Series The Middle East and Japan No.8

“A Beirut-Kyoto Connection: The Case for Mapping the Global Nahda”

JaCMES Lecture Series The Middle East and Japan No.8
Date / Time 24 February 2012 (Fri.) 19:00-20:30
Venue Crowne Plaza Beirut
Language Arabic and English (simultaneous interpretation available)
Organized by Japan Center for Middle Eastern Studies(JaCMES)
For further information Phone : +961-(0)1-975851 (JaCMES)
Summary
Nineteenth was a century of reforms and national self-strengthening. Each nation believed its situation unique and the changes it was going through sweeping, but paid attention to events beyond its borders. As early as the 1880s, Ottoman empire and Japan kept an eye on each other, realizing that in many ways they were doing the same things at the same time; painfully reinventing themselves as modern polities. And it was not always Tokyo that served as a model to Constantinople. Speaking in 1890, Japanese academic and later parliamentarian Kato Hiroyuki, reminded that Japan was following in Ottoman footsteps as the second nation in Asia to establish a constitutional government.
This lecture examines a moment when the history of an Ottoman port city infused by the impulse of reform and revival, connected to that of Japan’s former imperial capital. It traces how the opening of Butros al-Bustani’s Madrasa Wataniyya in 1862 stimulated the founding of the Syrian Protestant College in 1866 (now AUB) and in turn enabled a young Japanese pastor to open a similar school in Kyoto in 1875 (now Dōshisha University). By examining a particular example of 19th century connectivity, this lecture suggests the outlines of nahda as a global phenomenon.

Short Bio of the lecturer

Aleksandra Majstorac-Kobiljski

Aleksandra Majstorac-Kobiljski is a postdoctoral fellow at the Centre national de recherche scientifique, Paris France. Her forthcoming book – Learning to Be Modern – analyses the genesis and the connected history of the American University of Beirut and Dôshisha University in Kyoto. It weaves together the histories of Ottoman Beirut, Meiji Kyoto, and the post-Civil War Boston to bring into relief the intersection of the missionary agenda and local reform drives and illuminate the nineteenth-century global reform platform to which all three belonged.

Exchange Lecture on Culture and Society in Southeast Asia

Date / Time 16 February 2012 (Thu.) 14:00-17:00
Venue Conference Room, School of Social Sciences, University Malaysia Sabah(UMS)
KotaKinabalu, Malaysia
Language English
Organized by Kota Kinabaru Liaison Office
Jointly sponsored by School of Social Science, University Malaysia Sabah, Kotakinabalu
Program
14:05-14:45 Presentation 1 :
“Balinese Dance Drama Topeng Wali and its “Audience””Abstract
By Dr. Yukako YOSHIDA (Tsukuba University)
14:50-15:30 Presentation2 :
“Living a life with/beyond “Ajeg Bali”: a portrait of professional female Balinese Gamelan player “Bu Kocan””Abstract
By Dr. Kaori FUSHIKI (TUFS)
15:30-16:10 Presentation 3 :
“The Ritual Significance of Gong Ensemble Music and dance Among Dusunic Peoples in Sabah Presentation on Native Music in Sabah”
By Prof. Dr. Jaquline Kitigan (UMS)
16:10-16:50 Discussion
16:50-17:00 Closing Remarks by UMS representative

Public Lecture “Future of Syria, Part 2″

Date / Time 14 February 2012 (The.) 18:00-20:00
Venue Gakushikaikan Room 320 (3-28 Kandanishiki-cho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo)
Access Map
Language English and Japanese (simultaneous interpretation available)
Organized by Core Project “Human Mobility and Formation of Plural Societies in the Middle East and the Muslim World”
Jointly sponsored by Grant-In-Aid for Scientific Research “Space created by Lebanese and Syrian migrants: Confessionalism, clientelism, and civil society” (coordinator: Hidemitsu Kuroki)
Contact FSC Office, ILCAA, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies,
e-mail : fsc_office[at]aa.tufs.ac.jp; replace [at] with @
Open to the public, Free of charge
Nadim Shehadi (Associate Fellow, Royal Institute of International Affairs, London)
” “The Syrian Uprising and its regional and international impact: Syria is not Tunisia, is not Egypt, is not Lybia – what is it then?”
Commentator : Keiko SAKAI (Professor, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
Chair : Hidemitsu Kuroki (Professor, ILCAA, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)

Short Bio of the lecturer
Nadim Shehadi is an Associate Fellow of the Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House where he directs a programme on the regional dimension of the Palestinian refugee issue in the Middle East Peace Process. He is also a senior member of St Antony’s College Oxford where he was director of the Centre for Lebanese Studies from 1986 to 2005. Nadim is a member of the executive board of the Centro de Estudios de Oriente Medio of the Fundacion Promocion Social de la Cultura in Madrid. In 2010 he was a visiting fellow at the Aspen Institute in Washington DC and in the summer semester of 2012 he will be a visiting scholar at Tufts University. He is also a consultant to several governments and international organizations. Nadim was trained as an economist with an interest in the history of economic thought.

The 3rd meeting:ILCAA Joint Research Project "Citizenship for Migrants and Refugees"

Date / Time 5 February 2012 (Sun.) 13:00-18:30
Venue Room 304, ILCAA

Report (Japanese)

Koji HORINUKI (ILCAA Joint Researcher, The Institute of Energy Economics
“Nationals and Migrants in the Arab Gulf States: A Study on “National-minority States”
Kenichi YANAI (ILCAA Joint Researcher, ILCAA research fellow)
“Why and how to protect the HumanRights of non-nationals?” (Tentative Title)
All members “Research meeting”

The 4th meeting : ILCAA Joint Research Project "Human Mobility and Multi-ethnic Coexistence in Middle Eastern Urban Societies"

Date / Time 3 February 2012 (Fri.) 14:00-18:00 / 4 February 2012 (Sat.) 14:00-17:30
Venue Room 303 (Large Conference Room), ILCAA
3 February
Kaoru YAMAMOTO (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
"Dissociative Narratives in War-Torn Beirut: Sectarian Violence and Identity Crisis in Rashid al-Daif's Novels"
Aida KANAFANI-ZAHAR (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)
"Shattered coexistence and its recomposition: Beirut city center revisited"
Aiko NISHIKIDA (ILCAA)
"Contention over Public use of Space in the Central Jerusalem: The Mamilla cemetery and construction of the Museum of Tolerance"
Taku OSOEGAWA (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
"Impacts of the Middle East’s Regional Dynamics on Beirut’s inter-Sectarian Relations since 1990"
Takayuki YOSHIMURA (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
"From Lebanon to Karabagh: The case of Monte Melkonian,"
Bernard HOURCADE (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)
"The centers of Tehran: Social segregation, conflicts and meeting"
4 February
Stefan KNOST (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Orient-Institute Beirut)
"Public Space and City Centre(s)"
Hidemitsu KUROKI (ILCAA)
"’Outsiders’ at Administrative Center of Aleppo, 1849"
Yoichi TAKAMATSU (ILCAA)
"Valide Hanı: A Commercial Center in mid-19th Century Istanbul"
Masato IIZUKA (ILCAA)
"Standing at a crossroads?: Arab awakening 2011 and the Arab 'Islamists' thought on the coexistence of Muslims and non-Muslims"
Kosuke MATSUBARA (ILCAA Joint Researcher, University of Tsukuba)
"Examples of Utilization of the Multilayered Basemap System"
Discussion on "Multilayered Basemap System" and our activities of the fiscal year 2012

Lecture on Middle East and Islamic Studies “Problem of Legitimation in Kokand Khanate”

Date / Time 22 December 2011 (Thu.) 14:00-16:00
Venue Room 306, ILCAA
Language English
Organized by Core Project “Human Mobility and Formation of Plural Societies in the Middle East and the Muslim World”
Admission:Free, No registration is required.

Report (Japanese)

Aftandil ERKINOV (JSPS Fellow, Tashkent Institute of Oriental Studies)
“Problem of Legitimation in Kokand Khanate”

The 3rd meeting:ILCAA Joint Research Project "Early Modern Islamic States and Plural Societies"

Date / Time 10 December 2011 (Sat.) 14:00-18:00 /
11 December 2011 (Sun.) 13:00-17:00
Venue 304 (Multimedia Conference Room), ILCAA

Report (Japanese)

9 December
Tomofumi KAWAMOTO (University of Tokyo)
“The Ottoman Transfer of the Capital to Edirne and the Old Edirne Palace in the 15th Century”
Shingo YAMASHITA (University of Tokyo)
“The Aims of Historical Books and their Receptions: The Case of the Ottoman Empire in the 15th and 16th Centuries”
Kenji FUJIKI (Keio University)
“Merchants, Artisans and Guilds in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire: Tanners’ Guild in Istanbul in the 17th and 18th Century”

Study Meeting organized by MEIS2 “Potential of Multilayered Basemap System for Middle Eastern Cities”

Date / Time 17 November 2011 (Thu.) 17:00-18:00
Venue Room 304, ILCAA
Language Japanese
Organized by Core Project “Human Mobility and Formation of Plural Societies in the Middle East and the Muslim World”
Admission:Free, No registration is required.
Hidemitsu KUROKI (ILCAA)
“How the system started”
Kosuke MATSUBARA (ILCAA Joint Researcher, University of Tsukuba)
“Functions and utilities of the system”
Yoichi TAKAMATSU (ILCAA)
“Comments on the system”
Q & A

Public Lecture “Russian Presence in Modern Palestine”

Date / Time 21 October 2011 (Fri.) 17:30-19:30
Venue Room 304, 3rd Floor, ILCAA
Language Russian, with Japanese interpretation by Prof. Norihiro Naganawa, SRC
Organized by Core Project “Human Mobility and Formation of Plural Societies in the Middle East and the Muslim World”
Jointly sponsored by Group 5, Major Regional Powers in Eurasia Project, SRC
Contact FSC Office, ILCAA, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies,
e-mail : fsc_office[at]aa.tufs.ac.jp; replace [at] with @
Admission:Free
Dr. Elena Astafieva (Visiting Researcher, Slavic Research Center [SRC], Hokkaido University / Lecturer, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes [EPHE], France)
“The presence of Russian Orthodox Church in Palestine: On the context of diplomacy and domestic politics of the Russian Empire, late 19th-early 20th centuries”
Summary of the Lecture
Based on the new sources from the archives in Russia, France, the Vatican and Italy, I examine different modalities of the Russian presence in Palestine-Syria, and explore the activities of the institutions – diplomatic, religious, charitable, cultural – through which Russia exercised an influence in this region, during the second half of the 19th and early 20th centuries. This is a new attempt to combine different types of historical research – the history of international relations and the history of religions as well as of cultural and scientific developments – in order to understand the complexity of relationships between Russia’s domestic and foreign policies, and to clarify the place of Russia in Palestine-Syria among the European powers interfering in the region. My presentation evolves from the following two questions. How did the presence in these Arab provinces of the Ottoman Empire, the centre of three major world religions, enable the empire of the tsars vying with France, Britain, Germany, to strengthen its status as a great power not only in Palestine, but also in Europe? How did Russia’s political, religious and cultural presence in this region figure within a wider process of its construction and maintenance of the empire within and beyond its political borders?
Chair : Prof. Hidemitsu Kuroki (ILCAA)

“The Sheikh Ubeidullah Rebellion of 1880” [open]

Date / Time 14 October 2011 (Fri.) 16:30-18:30
Venue Hongo Satellite 4F
Language English and Japanese (simultaneous interpretation available)
Organized by Core Project “Human Mobility and Formation of Plural Societies in the Middle East and the Muslim World”
Dr.Sabri Ates (South Methodist University, USA)
“Uniting the Kurds under the Sultan’s banner: The Sheikh Ubeidullah Rebellion of 1880”
In the last months of 1880 a momentous event occurred at the Ottoman-Iranian borderland. Under the command of the influential leader of a Sunni religious brotherhood who was an Ottoman citizen, Sheykh Ubeidullah of Nehri, tens of thousands of Iranian and Ottoman Kurds marched on Iran and for some time managed to control several cities. This movement and the response of the Iranian army resulted in great violence and displacement: tens of thousands of families left their ancestral lands, villages and towns were depopulated, civilians lost their lives, and the affected districts were laid to waste. In this presentation Dr. Sabri Ates will discuss whether this was the first Kurdish nationalist uprising or yet another Ottoman effort to incorporate the Sunni parts of Iran into the Ottoman Empire.

The 2nd meeting:ILCAA Joint Research Project "Early Modern Islamic States and Plural Societies"

Date / Time 9 October 2011 (Sun.) 14:00-18:00 / 10 October 2011 (Mon.) 14:00-16:00
Venue 304 (Multimedia Conference Room), ILCAA
Language Japanese, English

Report (Japanese)

9 October
Akihiko YAMAGUCHI (ILCAA Joint Researcher, University of the Sacred Heart)
“The Formation of “Iran” as Seen from her Peripheries”
Mamoru TADA (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Miki High School)
“An Essay on the Establishment of Avariz-hane in the Ottoman Empire”
10 October
Sabri Ates (Southern Methodist University) 
“Strategic Rivalry or Sectarian Wars? Reconsidering the Ottoman-Safavid Conflict”
Following years of military and ideological confrontations, the Ottomans and Safavids signed their first treaty on 21 May 1555. This marked the first time the Ottomans recognized Safavid Iran as a legitimate entity. Such recognition, however, put an end to neither the military conflict between the parties nor their ideological rivalry. The Safavid state spent almost one fifth of its life fighting its Muslim neighbor. Considering historical debates on the nature of this confrontation, Dr. Sabri Ates argues that sectarianism informed the exchanges between the two states.

International Workshop on cultural Diversity in Southeast Asia

The 1st meeting:ILCAA Joint Research Project "Multi-disciplinary Study on Islam and Cultural Diversity in Southeast Asia"

 International Workshop on cultural Diversity in Southeast Asia
Date / Time 11 September 2011 (Sun.) 14:00-18:00
Venue Le Meridien Kota Kinabalu, Jalan Tun Fuad Stephens, Sinsuran, Kota Kinabalu, 88000, Malaysia
Language English
Organizer Kota Kinabaru Liaison Office
Program
14:00-14:05 Opening Remarks: Prof.Ikuya Tokoro (ILCAA, TUFS)
14:05–14:45 1st presentation :
Dr. Momo Shioya (ILCAA Joint Researcher, The University of Shimane)
“The Wedding ceremony as an Expression of Modern Muslim Identity: The Case of Central Java” Abstract
14:45–15:25 2nd presentation :
Dr. Koji Tsuda (ILCAA, TUFS)
“Batiks dyed with ‘Chineseness’: On Ethnic Chinese and their Cultural Representation in Post-Soeharto Indonesia”  Abstract
15:25–15:40 Break
15:40–16:20 3rd presentation :
Prof. Dr. Shamusul A. B. (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia)
“Diversity and peace in Malaysia: A commentary”  Abstract
16:20–16:30 1st comment :
Prof. Dr. Azizah Kassim (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia)
16:30–16:40 2nd comment :
Prof. Dr. Farouk Omar (Hiroshima City University)
16:40–16:55 Break
16:55–17:55 Discussion
17:55–18:00 Closing Remarks : Prof.Ikuya Tokoro (ILCAA, TUFS)


The 3rd meeting : ILCAA Joint Research Project "Human Mobility and Multi-ethnic Coexistence in Middle Eastern Urban Societies"

Date / Time 1 September 2011 (Thu.) 14:00-17:30 / 2 September 2011 (Fri.) 10:00-14:00
Venue JaCMES, Beirut
Language English

“Urban Space and Coexistence”

1 Septembery
Kaoru Yamamoto (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
"Fragmented City, Fragmented Narrative: Lebanese Novels in Wartime"
Aida KANAFANI-ZAHAR (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)
"Coexistence in Beirut (post-Ta’if agreement) and the role of civil actors"
Taku OSOEGAWA (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
"The impacts of the Middle East regional dynamics on Beirut’s inter-sectarian relations since 1990”
Takayuki YOSHIMURA (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
"The establishment of the Armenian communities in Lebanon and Syria"
Bernard HOURCADE (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)
"The Turks Azeris of Tehran: Elites and marginality"
Nobuaki KONDO (ILCAA)
"Urban space and coexistence: Non-Muslims in Tehran in 1880s"
2 September
Stefan KNOST (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Orient-Institute Beirut)
"Urban space and coexistence: The Christian neighbourhoods of Aleppo"
Hidemitsu KUROKI (ILCAA)
"Urban space and coexistence: Presence of a Muslim notable family in 'Christian quarters' of Ottoman Aleppo"
Masayuki UENO (ILCAA Joint Researcher, The University of Tokyo)
"Subjecthood/nationality of trans-imperial migrants to the Ottoman Empire in 1850s and 1860s"
Yoichi TAKAMATSU (ILCAA)
"Greek Orthodox population in the mid-nineteenth-century Istanbul"
Kosuke MATSUBARA (ILCAA Joint Researcher, University of Tsukuba)
"A case study for Multilayered Basemap System: Taking an example of J.C.David, 'Politique et urbanisme a Alep, Le projet de Bab al Faradj' , 1986"

Open Seminar “Urban life-worlds of Cameroonians in Dubai (United Arab Emirates)”

Date / Time 13 July 2011 (Wed.) 19:00-21:00
Venue Room 304, ILCAA
Language English
Organized by Core Project “Pluralistic World Understanding based on African Studies”
Jointly sponsored by Core Project “Human Mobility and Formation of Plural Societies in the Middle East and the Muslim World”, Japan Association for African Studies
Contact aaafrica[at]aa.tufs.ac.jp *Please change [at] to @.
Admission:Free, No registration is required.
Dr. Michaela Pelican (Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Zurich / ASAFAS, Kyoto University)
Urban life-worlds of Cameroonians in Dubai (United Arab Emirates)
Summary of the Lecture
This contribution deals with the life-worlds and social spaces of Cameroonian migrants in Dubai, a major metropolis linking African and Asian markets.
In recent years, Dubai has attracted large numbers of African traders and labour migrants who contribute significantly to the town’s commercial development and social life. The streets of Deira, Dubai’s ancient trading district, are populated by African merchants from all over the continent, exploring shops and markets, bargaining prices, arranging their acquisitions in hotel launches, taking a break in a street cafe, enjoying a meal in an Indian or African restaurant, or hanging out in an Ethiopian or Congolese night club.
Many Cameroonians who reside permanently in Dubai act as intermediaries and conduits to these merchants, facilitating their accommodation, purchases and transport of acquisitions back to Africa. They tend to organize their lives around economic constraints and the caprice of immigration regulations. At the same time, they struggle to create social spaces of mutual comfort and support, for example in the context of shared housing, church congregations, or aid and saving groups. However, reproducing social networks similar to those in Cameroon poses difficulties, as migrants’ realities differ considerably from life-worlds back home.

Public Lecture “Future of Syria”

Date / Time 3 July 2011 (Sun.) 15:00-18:00
Venue Gakushikaikan Room 320 (3-28 Kandanishiki-cho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo)
Access Map
Language Japanese
Organized by Core Project “Human Mobility and Formation of Plural Societies in the Middle East and the Muslim World”
Contact FSC Office, ILCAA, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies,
e-mail : fsc_office[at]aa.tufs.ac.jp; replace [at] with @
Open to the public, Free of charge
Chair : Masato IIZUKA (ILCAA)
Hidemitsu KUROKI (ILCAA)
“Current Situation in Syria”
Housam DARWISHEH (IDE-JETRO)
“Revolts in Syria: Dynamics of Popular Participation”
Hiroyuki AOYAMA (TUFS)
“Why Does not Assad Regime Fall?”
Hidemitsu KUROKI (ILCAA)
“Newness of Syria Revolt and its International Ciercumstances”
Comment by Keiko SAKAI (TUFS)
Q & A

20110703_1 20110703_2

The 1st meeting:ILCAA Joint Research Project "Early Modern Islamic States and Plural Societies"

Date / Time 18 June 2011 (Fri.) 13:00-18:00
Venue Hongo Satellite 4F

Report (Japanese)

Nobuaki KONDO (ILCAA)
“Safavid Studies: State of the Art and beyond”
Yoichi TAKAMATSU (ILCAA)
“Recent Developments Occurring around the Ottoman Studies and a Future Perspective”

JaCMES Lecture Series The Middle East and Japan No.7 cosponsored by JaCMES & CAMES (AUB)

JaCMES Lecture Series “The Middle East and Japan No.7”
Date / Time 1 June 2011 (Wed.) 17:00-18:30
Venue West Hall, second floor, Auditorium B, American University of Beirut
Language English-Arabic simultaneous interpretation available
Organized by Japan Center for Middle Eastern Studies(JaCMES)
Jointly sponsored by The Center for Arab and Middle Eastern Studies, American University of Beirut
For further information Japan Center for Middle Eastern Studies
- Phone (01) 975851
Open to the public, free of charge
Dr. Selcuk ESENBEL (Professor of Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey)
“The Transnational and World Power: Imperial Japan’s Global Claim to Asia and the World of Islam”

The abstract
Between 1868 and 1945, Japan turned an Asianist face toward the Muslims of the world in the quest for Asian reawakening. The pre-war mastermind of Japanese Pan-Asian thought Ōkawa Shūmei argued that Japan should form a partnership with the political energy of nationalism with Pan-Islamist discourse in the contemporary map of the World of Islam was to serve as an“international”against Western imperialist and colonialist hegemony. The military leader of the Imperial Way (kōdō-ha) clique of young Japanese nationalist officers General Araki Sadao argued that Muslims in the Chinese mainland were part of the international citadel against the Soviet Union and the Communist threat. The paper aims to decipher the history of Japanese involvement the Muslim hemisphere of Eurasia in terms of the inception of transnational networks, discourses, and strategies of the twentieth century in global politics and world power. The talk will introduce the author's recent publication Japan, Turkey, and the World of Islam, The Writings of Selcuk Esenbel, Leiden: Brill Global Oriental, 2011.

Dr. Selçuk Esenbel

Dr. Selçuk Esenbel
Born in Washington D. C. as the child of a diplomatic couple in the Embassy of the Republic of Turkey, Ayşe Selçuk Esenbel grew up in Turkey, Japan, and the United States. She completed her undergraduate degree in History in the International Christian University (Japan) and George Washington University (USA). She received her master’s degree from the Department of Japanese Language and Linguistics at Georgetown University (USA) in 1969 and a PhD in Japanese history from Columbia University (USA) in 1981. From 1982 to 1985, she was assistant professor at Bogaziçi (Bosphorus) University and became full professor in 1997, serving as Chair of the Department of History at Bogazici University between 1994 and 2003.
She has not only helped educate many junior scholars in her country but has also been actively promoting exchange between Turkey and Japan.

Esenbel helped establish the Japanese Studies Association in 1993 and consolidated the organization as a Board Member. She became its third president in 2002 and has since contributed to academic and intellectual exchange between the two countries through the organization and hosting of various conferences and lectures.
Esenbel is the director of the Asian Studies Center and the recent Asian Studies MA program which includes Japan and China majors as well as the Confucius Institute at Bogazici University. She contributed to the establishment of a Japanese language department at Ankara University in 1986, the Japanese language teaching program at Bogazici University in 1988, and the Japanese Studies Certificate in 2002. Her major publications in English include Japan, Turkey, and the World of Islam, (Brill Global Oriental, 2011) Even the Gods Rebel: The Peasants of Takaino and the 1871 Nakano uprising in Japan (Association for Asian Studies 1998) and The Rising Sun and the Turkish Crescent (co-authored) (Bogazici University Press, 2003). Her articles in Japanese are published in such books as Kindai Nihon to Toruko sekai and Ibunka rikai no shiza: Sekai kara mita Nihon, Nihon kara mita sekai. Her articles in English are published in journals such as the Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies (UK), and the American Historical Review (USA).

The 2nd meeting:ILCAA Joint Research Project "Citizenship for Migrants and Refugees"

Date / Time 14 May 2011 (Sat.) 13:00-18:30
Venue Room 304, ILCAA

Report (Japanese)

Lara, Tien-shi CHEN (ILCAA Joint Researcher, National Museum of Ethnology)

“Migrant, Refugee and the issue of Statelessness”
Shunsuke OZAKI (ILCAA Joint Researcher, ILCAA research fellow)
“Citizenship and Nationality in France―Rethinking the Significance of the 1889 Nationality Law”
All members “Research meeting”

Research Meeting on Middle East and Islamic Studies [open]

Date / Time 28 April 2011 (Thu.) 13:30-18:00
Venue ILCAA, 306
Mayuko OKAWA (Research Associate, ILCAA)
“The Historical Perception on the Omani Empire and the Formation of National History” [ Report ] (Japanese)
Takayuki YOSHIMURA (Junior Research Fellow, ILCAA)
“The Influence of the Armenian Repatriation on an Armenian Community Abroad ” [ Report ] (Japanese)

The 1st meeting:ILCAA Joint Research Project "Citizenship for Migrants and Refugees"

Date / Time 9 April 2011 (Sat.) 13:00-18:30
Venue Room 304, ILCAA

Report (Japanese)

Nozomu YAMAZAKI (ILCAA Joint Researcher, Komazawa University)
“The historic development of the citizenship concept : on the future of political community”
Aiko NISHIKIDA (ILCAA)
“Palestinans without nationality : Legal unstability of the refugees and displaced persons”

All members “Research meeting”

過去のイベント

過去のイベント

過去のイベント

過去のイベント

今後のイベント

過去のイベント

今後のイベント

過去のイベント

Upcoming Events

Past Events

今後のイベント

過去のイベント

Upcoming Events

Past Events

アーカイブ

    Archives

      アーカイブ

        Archives

          過去のペルシア語文書学セミナー

          Archives

          過去のアラビア語法廷文書セミナー

          Archives

          アーカイブ

            Archives

              バックナンバー

                Back Issues

                  Copyright © Middle East Muslim Society  〒183-8534 東京都府中市朝日町3-11-1  TEL: 042-330-5600
                  Copyright © Middle East Muslim Society    3-11-1 Asahi-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8534    Tel: 042-330-5600