JaCMES Lecture Series The Middle East and Japan No.8

“A Beirut-Kyoto Connection: The Case for Mapping the Global Nahda”

JaCMES Lecture Series The Middle East and Japan No.8
Date / Time 24 February 2012 (Fri.) 19:00-20:30
Venue Crowne Plaza Beirut
Language Arabic and English (simultaneous interpretation available)
Organized by Japan Center for Middle Eastern Studies(JaCMES)
For further information Phone : +961-(0)1-975851 (JaCMES)
Summary
Nineteenth was a century of reforms and national self-strengthening. Each nation believed its situation unique and the changes it was going through sweeping, but paid attention to events beyond its borders. As early as the 1880s, Ottoman empire and Japan kept an eye on each other, realizing that in many ways they were doing the same things at the same time; painfully reinventing themselves as modern polities. And it was not always Tokyo that served as a model to Constantinople. Speaking in 1890, Japanese academic and later parliamentarian Kato Hiroyuki, reminded that Japan was following in Ottoman footsteps as the second nation in Asia to establish a constitutional government.
This lecture examines a moment when the history of an Ottoman port city infused by the impulse of reform and revival, connected to that of Japan’s former imperial capital. It traces how the opening of Butros al-Bustani’s Madrasa Wataniyya in 1862 stimulated the founding of the Syrian Protestant College in 1866 (now AUB) and in turn enabled a young Japanese pastor to open a similar school in Kyoto in 1875 (now Dōshisha University). By examining a particular example of 19th century connectivity, this lecture suggests the outlines of nahda as a global phenomenon.

Short Bio of the lecturer

Aleksandra Majstorac-Kobiljski

Aleksandra Majstorac-Kobiljski is a postdoctoral fellow at the Centre national de recherche scientifique, Paris France. Her forthcoming book – Learning to Be Modern – analyses the genesis and the connected history of the American University of Beirut and Dôshisha University in Kyoto. It weaves together the histories of Ottoman Beirut, Meiji Kyoto, and the post-Civil War Boston to bring into relief the intersection of the missionary agenda and local reform drives and illuminate the nineteenth-century global reform platform to which all three belonged.

2011 Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies in Japan: The State of the Art

Date Friday, November 25, 2011
Venue Japan Center for Middle Eastern Studies, 2nd Floor, A2-1, Azariyeh Bldg,
Beirut Central District (Downtown Beirut)
Phone +961-(0)1-975851
Program of the meeting
14:30-14:40 Welcome Address by Hidemitsu Kuroki (Head, JaCMES/ Professor, ILCAA)
14:40-15:25 Junko Toriyama (Ph.D. Candidate, Ochanomizu University, Tokyo)
“Workings of power to the eyes of Cairene woman in her twenties in the eve of revolution”
15:25-16:10 Masaki Mizobuchi (Joint Researcher, Institute of Asian Cultures, Sophia University, Tokyo)
“Arab Spring and the United States: Twilight of the Pax-Americana?”
16:10-16:30 Break
16:30-17:15 Masako Shimizu (Ph.D. Candidate, Sophia University, Tokyo)
The Participation of Hamas in the Palestinian Authority: The processes, impacts and implications”
17:15-18:00 Yoko Fujii (Lecturer, Nihon University, Tokyo)
“Lebanon’s image in narratives of pilgrimage in the 17th century”
18:00-18:20 Break
18:20-19:05 Takayoshi Kuromiya (Ph.D. Candidate, Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo)
“Economic growth of resource-exporting countries: Taking Egypt and Saudi Arabia as examples”
19:05-19:50 Shigeto Kondo (Ph.D. Candidate, Keio University, Tokyo)
“‘Small states’ diplomacy’ during the First Oil Crisis: The cases of Kuwait, 1970-1973”
Commentators :
Sari Hanafi (Professor, American University of Beirut)
Hilal Khashan (Professor, American University of Beirut)
Karim Makdisi (Associate Professor, American University of Beirut)
Ray Mouawad (Assistant Professor, Lebanese American University)
Jean-François Verne (Associate Professor, Kaslik Holy Spirit University)
Habib Malik (Associate Professor, Lebanese American University)
Observers and ILCAA staffs :
Massoud Daher (Professor, Lebanese University)
Guita Hourani (Director, Lebanese Emigration Research Center, Notre Dame University)
Khalil Karam (Vice President/ Professor, Saint Joseph University)
Seiko Sugita (Programme Specialist, UNESCO)
Peter Sluglett (Professor, National University of Singapore)
Carole Doueiry Verne (Associate Professor, Saint Joseph University)
Masato Iizuka (Professor, ILCAA)
Nobuaki Kondo (Associate Professor, ILCAA)
Hidemitsu Kuroki (Professor, ILCAA)
Taku Osoegawa (Research Associate, JaCMES, ILCAA)

JaCMES Lecture Series The Middle East and Japan No.7 cosponsored by JaCMES & CAMES (AUB)

JaCMES Lecture Series “The Middle East and Japan No.7”
Date / Time 1 June 2011 (Wed.) 17:00-18:30
Venue West Hall, second floor, Auditorium B, American University of Beirut
Language English-Arabic simultaneous interpretation available
Organized by Japan Center for Middle Eastern Studies(JaCMES)
Jointly sponsored by The Center for Arab and Middle Eastern Studies, American University of Beirut
For further information Japan Center for Middle Eastern Studies
- Phone (01) 975851
Open to the public, free of charge
Dr. Selcuk ESENBEL (Professor of Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey)
“The Transnational and World Power: Imperial Japan’s Global Claim to Asia and the World of Islam”

The abstract
Between 1868 and 1945, Japan turned an Asianist face toward the Muslims of the world in the quest for Asian reawakening. The pre-war mastermind of Japanese Pan-Asian thought Ōkawa Shūmei argued that Japan should form a partnership with the political energy of nationalism with Pan-Islamist discourse in the contemporary map of the World of Islam was to serve as an“international”against Western imperialist and colonialist hegemony. The military leader of the Imperial Way (kōdō-ha) clique of young Japanese nationalist officers General Araki Sadao argued that Muslims in the Chinese mainland were part of the international citadel against the Soviet Union and the Communist threat. The paper aims to decipher the history of Japanese involvement the Muslim hemisphere of Eurasia in terms of the inception of transnational networks, discourses, and strategies of the twentieth century in global politics and world power. The talk will introduce the author's recent publication Japan, Turkey, and the World of Islam, The Writings of Selcuk Esenbel, Leiden: Brill Global Oriental, 2011.

Dr. Selçuk Esenbel

Dr. Selçuk Esenbel
Born in Washington D. C. as the child of a diplomatic couple in the Embassy of the Republic of Turkey, Ayşe Selçuk Esenbel grew up in Turkey, Japan, and the United States. She completed her undergraduate degree in History in the International Christian University (Japan) and George Washington University (USA). She received her master’s degree from the Department of Japanese Language and Linguistics at Georgetown University (USA) in 1969 and a PhD in Japanese history from Columbia University (USA) in 1981. From 1982 to 1985, she was assistant professor at Bogaziçi (Bosphorus) University and became full professor in 1997, serving as Chair of the Department of History at Bogazici University between 1994 and 2003.
She has not only helped educate many junior scholars in her country but has also been actively promoting exchange between Turkey and Japan.

Esenbel helped establish the Japanese Studies Association in 1993 and consolidated the organization as a Board Member. She became its third president in 2002 and has since contributed to academic and intellectual exchange between the two countries through the organization and hosting of various conferences and lectures.
Esenbel is the director of the Asian Studies Center and the recent Asian Studies MA program which includes Japan and China majors as well as the Confucius Institute at Bogazici University. She contributed to the establishment of a Japanese language department at Ankara University in 1986, the Japanese language teaching program at Bogazici University in 1988, and the Japanese Studies Certificate in 2002. Her major publications in English include Japan, Turkey, and the World of Islam, (Brill Global Oriental, 2011) Even the Gods Rebel: The Peasants of Takaino and the 1871 Nakano uprising in Japan (Association for Asian Studies 1998) and The Rising Sun and the Turkish Crescent (co-authored) (Bogazici University Press, 2003). Her articles in Japanese are published in such books as Kindai Nihon to Toruko sekai and Ibunka rikai no shiza: Sekai kara mita Nihon, Nihon kara mita sekai. Her articles in English are published in journals such as the Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies (UK), and the American Historical Review (USA).

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